CJF Jackman Award for Excellence in Journalism

Top: Tessa Vikander (L) and Eden Fine Day (R) accept the CJF Jackman Award for Excellence - Small Media, on behalf of IndigiNews. Bottom: In the large media category, Mark MacKinnon (R) was joined on stage by Afghan colleague and "fixer" Mohammed Sharif Sharaf. (Stephanie Lake/The Canadian Press)

The Globe and Mail and IndigiNews win CJF Jackman Awards for Excellence in Journalism

 

TORONTOJune 7, 2022 – The Globe and Mail is this year’s winner of the CJF Jackman Award for Excellence in Journalism in the large-media category, announced tonight at the annual Canadian Journalism Foundation Awards.

The CJF honoured the Globe for “Escape from Afghanistan,” a story documenting journalist Mark MacKinnon’s courageous work on the efforts to evacuate Afghan nationals following the fall of Afghanistan. It is the Globe‘s sixth win in the award’s 26-year history.

Through this prestigious award, the CJF has since 1996 recognized news organizations that embrace ideals of journalistic excellence – originality, courage, independence, accuracy, social responsibility, accountability and diversity.

One juror described The Globe and Mail’s winning stories as, “gripping tales that transport the audience to the chaos and desperation experienced by those trying to escape a humanitarian disaster, and the frustrations, failures and limits of those who tried to help them…”

In the small-media category, IndigiNews, a free, online Indigenous-led news platform, won for its revelatory reporting on the B.C. government’s controversial practice of birth alerts that were declared “illegal and unconstitutional” by lawyers months before the government stopped the program.

On their work, the jury remarked: “this year’s honouree is an organization that boasts a courageous roster of storytellers dedicated to covering the news in a way that allows for your stories to be heard, understood and respected. They are journalists who tell the stories of their British Columbia communities in a manner that is nothing short of brave.”

All five finalists in the large media category (more than 50 full-time employees) and the stories and/or series shortlisted for the award were:

“Clean Water, Broken Promises” Consortium, for “Clean Water, Broken Promises,” a collaborative investigation into water issues in First Nations involving 75 student journalists and more than 125 students, instructors, journalists, editors and producers.
Series overview:

Global Newsfor its investigation into widespread sexual misconduct and abuse of power in the most senior ranks of the Canadian military, resulting in what experts have since called a “crisis” of sexual misconduct.
Stories submitted:

Le Devoir, for its investigative series into the deaths of citizens during police interventions over a 20-year period in Quebec.
Stories submitted:

Winner: The Globe and Mail, for “Escape from Afghanistan,” a story documenting journalist Mark MacKinnon’s courageous work on the efforts to evacuate Afghan nationals following the fall of Afghanistan.
Stories submitted:

Winnipeg Free Press, for “Life and Death Behind Bars,” an eight-part investigative series into prison conditions at the Stony Mountain Institution, Manitoba’s only federal penitentiary.
Stories submitted:

All five finalists in the small media category (fewer than 50 full-time employees) and the stories and/or series shortlisted for the award were:

Winner: IndigiNews, for exposing that government lawyers had told the B.C. government that the controversial practice of birth alerts was “illegal and unconstitutional” months before it stopped the program.
Stories submitted:

Rocky Mountain Outlook, for “Buried in the Aftermath,” a four-part series on how the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides handles avalanche fatalities on guided trips in the Canadian Rockies.
Stories submitted: 

Saskatoon StarPhoenix, for “Trapped,” a seven-part series that reveals how government systems are woefully unprepared to help people struggling with substance use.
Stories submitted: 

The Narwhal, for Amber Bracken’s first-person photo essay that connected her arrest while covering an Indigenous anti-pipeline protest with broader police violations of journalists’ rights.
Stories submitted:

The Tyeefor its investigation into the Alberta government’s covert efforts to undo decades-old regulations to open up the Rockies’ sensitive eastern slopes to open-pit coal mining.
Stories submitted:

About the CJF Jackman Award for Excellence in Journalism

The CJF Jackman Award for Excellence in Journalism honours a Canadian organization that embodies exemplary journalism with a resulting impact on the community it serves.

On the 25th anniversary of the CJF in 2015, the Excellence in Journalism Award was named after Eric Jackman, the founder of the CJF, a business leader and award-winning clinical psychologist. Jackman—along with the founding directors—developed the criteria for this award, which reflects his passion and deep commitment to the CJF’s mission, and recognizes his vision, guidance and continued contribution to strengthening journalism.

Since 1996, the CJF has celebrated news organizations that embrace ideals of journalistic excellence – accuracy, independence, accountability, courage and originality – with this annual award.

Winners, since 2007, are selected in two categories: large media and small media. Applicants can enter either category, determined by the size of staff for reporting, production, technical and presentation support and the staff they can draw upon within any larger organization of which they are a part:
– large media organization (more than 50 full-time employees)- small media organization (50 full-time employees or less)

Entrants must indicate which of these two categories they represent. There is a $200 application fee for large media organizations and a $100 application fee for small media organizations.

Submission Requirements

– Entries will be judged on a specific story or series of stories produced by each organization during the 2021 calendar year.

– Only material published or broadcast in 2021 may be submitted.

– Only one entry will be accepted from a single Canadian print media outlet, broadcast program or online news organization.

– Entries may have up to THREE individual items on a common theme. Can include: articles, editorials, blogs, photographs, cartoons, videos, radio broadcasts, interactive graphics, multimedia projects.

In addition to a short summary of the proposal, the following questions should be addressed (with the weight each represents):

– Detail the resources in time and numbers dedicated to the work submitted, compared to the overall resources of the news organization. Describe the extent of work that went into the production of the story or series. (30%)

– Explain why your news organization selected this topic. (10%)

– Describe with supporting evidence the distinctiveness of the story (e.g. impact of the story/stories, specific communities affected, exceptional resourcefulness demonstrated by an individual reporter or reporters in a breaking news event, innovative technologies used to deliver the story).  (30%)

– From this list of standards for excellence in journalism, select up to three that are most applicable to your submission and explain why you selected each of them: Originality, Courage, Independence, Accuracy, Social Responsibility, Accountability, Diversity. (30%)

In evaluating each entry, the jury will consider:
– 
Quality of Writing/Storytelling
– Clarity of Work Submitted- Stated Impact on Community

Judging Methodology

The judging panel is comprised of four to eight jurors (with bilingual representatives), who review all submitted entries through an online portal, rank the entries and then attend a face-to-face meeting or participate via conference call with their rankings to agree upon the finalists and recipient of the award. The finalists will be announced in April and May. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. The recipient is announced at the CJF Awards virtual ceremony in June 2022.

The finalists will be announced in April or May. The recipient is determined by a jury.

Please contact CJF president and executive director Natalie Turvey should you have any questions.

RECIPIENTS
2021
The Globe and Mail
(large media)For its series investigating why Canada’s pandemic preparedness system was unable to initially respond effectively to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Narwhal (small media)
For its groundbreaking reporting based on freedom-of-information requests about the beleaguered Site C dam, the most expensive public project in BC’s history.

2020
The Globe and Mail
(large media)For breaking the story of the SNC-Lavalin affair and its follow-up coverage

The London Free Press
(small media)For its “Face It” project exploring the interconnected problems of, and potential solutions to, low-employment participation, a lack of shelter and entrenched addiction in London

2019
CBC News
(large media)For Missing & Murdered: Finding Cleo

Saskatoon StarPhoenix and Regina Leader-Post
(small media)For their joint coverage of the Humboldt Broncos

2018 
The Globe and Mail
(large media)”Unfounded” seriesRobyn Doolittle, investigative reporter

The Independent
of Petrolia and Central Lambton(small media)For stories revealing conflicts of interest by the chief administrative officer for the southwestern Ontario town of PetroliaHeather Wright, editor and publisher

2017

The Canadian Press
(large media)”Open Secret” seriesAndrea Baillie, managing editorKristy Kirkup, national affairs reporterHeather Scoffield, Ottawa bureau chiefSheryl Ubelacker, health reporter

The London Free Press
(small media)”Indiscernible”Randy Richmond, reporter

2016
CBC News
(large media)Jennifer McGuire, general manager and editor-in-chiefCecil Rosner, managing editor, CBC Manitoba

Telegraph-Journal (Saint John, N.B.)
(small media)Adam Huras, provincial editor

2015
The Globe and Mail
(large media)David Walmsley, Editor-in-ChiefIngrid Peritz, correspondent, Montreal

The Coast
(small media)Kyle Shaw, Publisher

2014
Toronto Star
(large media)Michael Cooke, Editor

Vancouver Observer
(local media)Linda Solomon, Founder and Editor-in-Chief

2013
Winnipeg Free Press
(large media)Paul Samyn, Editor

The Tyee
(small media)Michelle Hoar, Director of Publishing and Advertising

2012
The Current (CBC Radio)
(large media)Pam Bertrand, Executive ProducerAnna Maria Tremonti, Host

Vancouver Observer
(small media)Linda Solomon, Founder and Editor-in-Chief

2011
Toronto Star
(large media)Michael Cooke, Editor-in-Chief

CBC Manitoba
(small media)Cecil Rosner, Managing Editor

2010
Toronto Star
(large media)Michael Cooke, Editor-in-Chief

Metroland Durham Region
(small media)Joanne Burghardt, Editor-in-Chief

2009
Winnipeg Free Press
(large media)Margo Goodhand, Editor-in-Chief

The Tyee
(small media)David Beers, Editor-in-Chief

2008
The Canadian Press
(large media)Scott White, Editor-in-Chief

The Telegram
(small media)Russell Wangersky, Editor-in-Chief

2007
The Hamilton Spectator
(large media)David Estok, Editor-in-Chief

The Guelph Mercury
(small media)Lynn Haddrall, Editor-in-Chief

2006
The Globe and Mail
Edward Greenspon, Editor-in-Chief

2005
The Hamilton Spectator
Dana Robbins, Editor-in-Chief

2004
CBC News
Tony Burman, Editor-in-Chief

2003
The Record of Waterloo Region
Lynn Haddrall, Editor-in-Chief

2002
CTV News
Kirk LaPointe, Senior Vice-President

2001
CBC – Canada Now – WinnipegCecil Rosner, Executive Producer2000
The Ottawa Citizen
Neil Reynolds, Editor

1999
Maclean’s Magazine
Bob Lewis, Editor-in-Chief

1998
The Toronto Star
John Honderich, Publisher

1997
CBC Newfoundland and Labrador Television News and Current AffairsBob Wakeham, Area/Executive Producer

1996
The Telegraph-Journal and Evening Times-Globe of Saint John, New Brunswick
Neil Reynolds, Editor