CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowships

The CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowships

TORONTO, March 20, 2024 – Jaclyn Hall, Odette Auger and Savannah Ridley are the recipients of this year’s CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowships, established to amplify Indigenous voices and foster better comprehension of Indigenous issues.

The award provides three early-career Indigenous journalists with the opportunity to explore issues of interest while being hosted for one month at the CBC Indigenous in Winnipeg.

Hall, a self-taught journalist born and raised in the community of Akwesasne, which straddles the U.S./Canada border, has travelled and reported extensively on Indigenous issues across Canada. She plans to use her time at CBC Indigenous to cover the ongoing impacts of Indian Day Schools on survivors and communities.

“I admire Jaclyn’s self-taught determination to pursue journalism and strong community connections,” says Duncan McCue, jury chair and former host of CBC’s Cross Country Check Up, now an associate professor at Carleton University’s School of Journalism and Communication. “This Fellowship will help her polish her skills and put her on a path to a career.”

Auger, an award-winning freelance Sagamok Anishnawbek journalist currently living on the west coast in toq qaymɩxʷ (Klahoose) territory, impressed jurors with a pitch on exploring patterns of colonial misogyny with voices from women chiefs and elders.

Adds jury member Tanya Talaga, president of Makwa Creative: “Odette has a thoughtful idea, a proven track record and the experience needed to take the next steps.”

Savannah Ridley, a student journalist currently studying at Toronto Metropolitan University, is reconnecting with her community in the Turtle Tribe of the Seneca. According to the jury, she brings a strong sense of her own antecedents and history to her proposal for a feature investigating the effects of “pretendian” unmaskings on Indigenous people reconnecting with their cultures.

“Savannah seems primed to benefit from this opportunity,” says juror and Indigenous rights lawyer Maggie Wente. “Her pitch is timely, well written and thought out, and interesting because of the personal connection.”

The story or series resulting from the fellowship experiences will be considered for publication or broadcast by CBC News.

 

“This year’s Indigenous Journalism Fellows have demonstrated strong commitment to community and the ability to ask compelling questions about timely topics,” says Meagan Fiddler, senior producer at CBC Indigenous. “I look forward to welcoming them aboard.”

 

The CJF provides each fellow a $4,000 training stipend along with a per-diem allowance for meals and other reasonable expenses.

 

The recipients will be recognized at the CJF Awards ceremony on June 12 at the Royal York Hotel. For tickets, tables and sponsorship opportunities, see contact information below or visit the CJF Awards page.

The CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowships jury members are:

  • Duncan McCue(chair), former host of CBC’s Cross Country Check Up, now associate professor at Carleton University’s School of Journalism and Communication;
  • Meagan Fiddler, senior producer, CBC Indigenous;
  • Eden Fineday, publisher, IndigiNews;
  • Lenard Monkman, reporter with CBC Indigenous and recipient of a 2017 CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowship;
  • Tanya Talaga, author, journalist and president and CEO of Makwa Creative; and
  • Maggie Wente, Indigenous rights lawyer at Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP in Toronto.

 

These fellowship opportunities are made possible thanks to the generous support of Sobeys Inc.

Encouraging Indigenous voices and issues in the media

The CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowships are offered to three Indigenous journalists with one to ten years of experience to explore an issue of interest, while being hosted for one month at the CBC Indigenous in Winnipeg. The award aims to foster better comprehension of Indigenous issues in Canada’s major media and community outlets.

Successful applicants will:

• Spend one month with CBC Indigenous in Winnipeg. This may be offered as a remote experience. (www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous).

• Have a training stipend of $4,000, all associated travel and accommodation, a per diem for meals and other reasonable expenses, provided by The Canadian Journalism Foundation.

• Write or produce an article/piece or series upon completion of their fellowship opportunity, which will be considered for publication or broadcast by CBC News.

The recipient will be selected by a jury. All arrangements for the award assignment will be made in consultation with award winners.

Judging Methodology

The judging panel consists of four to eight jurors who review all submitted entries through an online portal, rank the entries and then attend a meeting with their rankings to agree upon the recipients of the award. The recipients are announced in April or May, and are recognized at the annual CJF Awards virtual ceremony in June 2024.

For information, contact:

Natalie Turvey

President and Executive Director

The Canadian Journalism Foundation

nturvey@cjf-fjc.ca

THE CJF THANKS THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT

PAST RECIPIENTS
Click the links to read about each fellowship experience.

2023
Tchadas Leo, Tanner Isaac, Sara Kae

2022
Renée Lilley, Erin Blondeau

2021

Riley Yesno, Shayla Sayer-Brabant

2020
Sean Vanderklis, Karl Dockstader

2019
Charnel Anderson
Logan Perley

2018
Jasmine Kabatay
Ntawnis Piapot
2017
Lenard Monkman
Julian Brave NoiseCat 
2016
Stephanie Cram
Trevor Jang

2015
Nikki Wiart
Wawmeesh G. Hamilton

2014
Chantelle Bellrichard


The fellows will receive a training stipend of $4,000. All associated travel and accommodation, a per diem for meals and other reasonable expenses will also be provided by the CJF.