CJF Award for Climate Solutions Reporting

The Globe and Mail was awarded this year's CJF Award for Climate Solutions Reporting. Ryan MacDonald (right), was joined by his team members on stage (R to L): Kathryn Blaze Baum, Jeffrey Jones and Adam Radwanski. (Stephanie Lake/The Canadian Press)

TORONTO, June 7, 2022 – The CJF Award for Climate Solutions Reporting, which celebrates a journalist or journalistic team whose work shines a spotlight on climate change and innovative solutions, went to the Globe and Mail‘s team of climate journalists, which includes Ryan MacDonaldKathryn Blaze BaumJeffrey Jones and Adam Radwanski, for their narrative-shifting stories on how to re-engineer the economy to adapt to and capitalize on climate change.

CJF thanks the generosity of founding award sponsor Intact Financial Corporation for providing the award’s $10,000 prize.

On the winner, one juror remarked: “the recipients of this year’s award come from a newsroom that – at a time when newsrooms across Canada are shrinking – has expanded huge energy and resources to dig into the vital topic of climate change.”

The other finalists for this year’s award and the stories or series shortlisted were:

Joel Balsam and photojournalist Stephanie Foden for their Globe and Mail reporting on an Innu band council and regional municipality’s attempt to declare Quebec’s Magpie River a legal person – which would be a first in Canada. In practice, this would mean that the river’s human guardians could take legal action if the river is polluted by other actors.

The team of journalists behind the CBC Radio series What on Earth, which includes Manusha JanakiramLaura LynchMolly SegalLisa JohnsonRachel SandersSerena Renner and Mathias Wolfsohn, for telling stories that highlight the human and natural costs of rising emissions and what can be done about it. What on Earth won the inaugural award last year.

The team of journalists behind the CBC’s The Doc Project podcast, which includes Acey RoweBrad BadeltJoan WebberJennifer Warren and Althea Manasan, for “Big Tree Hunt,” an episode exploring the issue of ancient tree logging in British Columbia from different perspectives.

The team of journalists behind Canada’s National Observer’s Race Against Climate Change miniseries, which includes Shaghayegh TajvidiPolly Leger and Linda Solomon Wood. The series shares stories on climate solutions using an intersectional lens, approachable tone and a focus on human values.

“The reporting from these finalists took us on a hopscotch across the provinces and touched on topics ranging from small businesses innovating on climate solutions to the photography of old growth forests,” says jury member Madeleine Orr, founder of The Sport Ecology Group and lecturer at Loughborough University London in England. “These journalists offered reasons to be optimistic about Canada’s future amid the climate emergency. Thank you also to the editors and producers who have embraced climate journalism.”

ABOUT THE AWARD

Climate change is one of the defining challenges of our time. The impacts of global warming and extreme weather events are already being felt in Canada and are forecast by scientists to become more severe and more frequent. Beyond environmental and physical impacts, climate change is also expected to have significant economic and social impacts.

Climate change demands to be a constant and significant part of Canadian conversation and the media has a vital role to play in providing accurate, contextual information that creates the foundation for civic discourse about its scope and potential solutions being considered or implemented. The CJF Award for Climate Solutions Reporting recognizes excellence in reporting on what is being done in Canada and beyond to address the impact and threat of climate change – the policies, practices and people that could potentially be part of the solution to this global crisis.

The CJF Award for Climate Solutions Reporting celebrates innovative work done by Canadian journalists to shine a light on adaptive solutions being tested and implemented to address the environmental challenges affecting the world today and in the future. The award will aim to inspire broader, more prescriptive coverage of the climate crisis we all face by raising awareness about the challenges themselves and the work being done to meet them.

Judges will consider the following criteria in adjudicating this award:

  •  How does this work highlight responses and solutions to climate change? Does it shift the narrative from the problem to solutions that empower positive change?
    •    What evidence is there to show that the solution is working? In what ways is it not or might it not? What metrics are used and why in assessing this solution?
  •  What data supports the problem and the solution?
  •  Is the overall climate data cited accurately and is there sufficient evidence of verification? Is there a sufficient scope and diversity of sources cited?
  •  Judges will note that false balance can be the enemy of accuracy and truth in reporting on climate change. Trying to balance scientific consensus on climate change with views from climate deniers or others who disagree with scientific findings risks misleading news audiences.

FORM OF THE AWARD

The award recipient will receive a $10,000 prize.

ELIGIBILITY

Climate change is a story that matters in many spheres – an all-encompassing issue with a wide scope that can include not just the environment but also science, health, the economy, business, public policy, migration, politics and people on a local, national and global scale.

This award will be presented to a working journalist or team of journalists (employed full-time or freelance) who have been judged to have done the most to shine a spotlight on climate change and innovative solutions in Canadian print, broadcast or online news reporting in 2021.

Entries involving more than one contributor are welcome and will be judged as a single submission. Submissions are welcome in the following formats: article, column, online piece, editorial, op-ed, radio program, podcast, television program or documentary film.

JURY

Jury to be announced soon. 

SUBMISSIONS ARE CLOSED

PAST WINNERS

– 2021: The team of journalists behind the CBC Radio series What on Earth was the inaugural recipient of the new CJF Award for Climate Solutions Reporting. The winning CBC team members were: Laura Lynch – host; Joan Melanson – executive producer; Manusha Janakiram – senior producer; Lisa Johnson – producer; Molly Segal – producer; Rachel Sanders – associate producer; and Mathias Wolfsohn – engineer. View the acceptance speech by Laura Lynch, host of What on Earth.

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For inquiries:
Natalie Turvey

President and Executive Director

The Canadian Journalism Foundation
E-mail: nturvey@cjf-fjc.ca

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IN PARTNERSHIP WITH 

About Intact Financial Corporation

Intact Financial Corporation (TSX: IFC) is the largest provider of property and casualty (P&C) insurance in Canada and a leading provider of specialty insurance in North America, with over CAD$11 billion in total annual premiums. The Company has approximately 16,000 employees who serve more than five million personal, business and public sector clients through offices in Canada and the U.S.

In Canada, Intact distributes insurance under the Intact Insurance brand through a wide network of brokers, including its wholly-owned subsidiary BrokerLink, and directly to consumers through belairdirect. Frank Cowan Company, a leading MGA, distributes public entity insurance programs including risk and claims management services in Canada.

In the U.S., Intact Insurance Specialty Solutions provides a range of specialty insurance products and services through independent agencies, regional and national brokers, and wholesalers and managing general agencies. Products are underwritten by the insurance company subsidiaries of Intact Insurance Group USA, LLC.