• The Globe and Mail Centre
  • April 4, 2018 - 14:00

In partnership with

CIPPIC




A half-day symposium exploring the right to be forgotten

 

- View the video: Part 1 and Part 2

- Listen to Part 1 and Part 2 of the symposium

- View the photos

_ View the coverage on CPAC


- View the results of the poll by Maru/Matchbox, commissioned by the CJF. View the press release.

- See the Canadian Marketing Association's Attitudes towards Privacy and Transparency, presented by Amanda Maltby

- View the CJF Symposium White Paper




The so-called right to be forgotten is coming to Canada. Earlier this year, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner released a draft policy claiming the right for individuals to remove certain search engine results already exists within current privacy laws. Should Canadians welcome a version of this European law? Or are the trade-offs for Charter-protected access to information too great? Explore the intersection of reputation and freedom of expression at a half-day summit featuring privacy experts, the tech industry and journalism leaders as they explore the implications for Canada.

Wednesday, April 4

2-6pm


The Globe and Mail Centre

351 King Street East, Level 17

Toronto

View map

 

SCHEDULE 



PART ONE




1:30 p.m. Doors open and registration

2:00 p.m. Opening remarks

Natalie Turvey, executive director of The Canadian Journalism Foundation and David Fewer, director of CIPPIC

2:10 p.m. How Canadians View Digital Privacy and Transparency

Amanda Maltby, Chair of Privacy and Data Advisory Committee, Canadian Marketing Association, and General Manager, Compliance and Chief Privacy Officer, Canada Post



2:30 p.m. Policy and Privacy in the Digital World

Daniel Therrien, Privacy Commissioner of Canada, in conversation with Simon Houpt, senior media reporter, The Globe and Mail



3:00 p.m. Privacy and the Charter

A debate between David Fraser, Internet, Technology and Privacy Lawyer/Partner, McInnes Cooper, and Keith D. Rose, Technology Lawyer/Associate, McCarthy Tétrault, moderated by Esther Enkin, Ombudsman for CBC English Services

3:40 p.m. Break

PART TWO



3:50 p.m. Privacy, Expression and Search Engines


Peter Fleischer, Global Privacy Counsel, Google, in conversation with Christine Dobby, Telecom Reporter, The Globe and Mail



4:30 p.m. Canada's Privacy Paradigm

Michael Geist, Privacy Expert/Law Professor at the University of Ottawa and Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law, in conversation with Susan Krashinsky Robertson, marketing and media reporter, The Globe and Mail

5:15 - 6:00 p.m. Cocktail Reception

 



ABOUT THE SPEAKERS



Amanda Maltby
Amanda Maltby is General Manager, Compliance and Chief Privacy Officer, Canada Post Corporation and currently sits on the Canadian Marketing Association’s Board of Directors and Chairs the CMA’s Data and Privacy Committee. In her role with Canada Post, Maltby is responsible for regulatory and program compliance in the areas of customer and employee privacy, access to information, information management, official languages, whistleblowing and anti-money laundering and oversees the Canada Post’s Code of Ethics and Business Conduct. Maltby was influential in the development of the Canadian Standard on Fair Information Practices and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA).





 

Daniel Therrien
Daniel Therrien was appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada on June 5, 2014 after three decades serving Canadians as a lawyer with various federal departments where human rights issues were important. Commissioner Therrien has said that the over-arching goal of his mandate is to increase the control Canadians have over their personal information. Since his appointment, he has championed privacy rights in the public debate over national security and public safety, and led research and investigations into privacy issues that go to the heart of consumer trust and confidence. Commissioner Therrien holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Licence en droit from the University of Ottawa. He was called to the Quebec Bar in 1981.

 

 

Simon Houpt
Simon Houpt is The Globe and Mail's senior media writer, charged with covering the industry's transformation. He began his career with The Globe in 1999 as the paper's New York arts correspondent, covering the cultural life of that city through Canadian eyes. After 10 years on the beat, including six as a weekly columnist, he returned to the Globe's Toronto news room in the summer of 2009 to join the Report on Business as its advertising and marketing reporter. Prior to The Globe, Houpt worked on the CBC-TV new media current affairs show Undercurrents. He is the author of Museum of the Missing: A History of Art Theft. @simonhoupt

 







David Fraser
David Fraser is an Internet, Technology and Privacy Lawyer, and Partner, McInnes Cooper. He is well-known as one of Canada’s leading internet, technology and privacy lawyers. He advises a range of clients on all aspects of technology and privacy laws. Fraser advises private and public sector clients to implement compliance programs for Canadian privacy legislation, including the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (Canada), the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (Nova Scotia) and the Privacy Act (Canada). He provides opinions on privacy laws for both Canadian and international clients and is a frequently invited speaker on this topic. Fraser also acts for complainants and respondents in matters referred to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. 

 

 

Keith Rose
Keith Rose is a technology lawyer and associate at McCarthy Tétrault. He draws on a practical background in the IT and telecommunications businesses, with more than a decade of prior experience as a software developer and project manager, as well as a deep interest in the interfaces between law and technology in the real world, to identify and resolve legal problems. Rose advises clients on a range of technology and communications law issues including privacy and anti-spam compliance, intellectual property, e-commerce, and regulatory issues and acts for clients on a variety of transactions including licensing, procurement, and outsourcing.

 

 





Esther Enkin
Esther Enkin was appointed the Corporation's Ombudsman for English Services in 2012. Enkin has over 25 years of journalism experience with CBC News, and is recognized in Canada and abroad for her knowledge in the field of journalistic ethics, theory and practice. Until her nomination as CBC Ombudsman, she was Executive Editor of CBC News, where she was responsible for the quality of CBC journalism, overseeing the development of policy and ensuring CBC's journalistic standards were met nationally and regionally, on all platforms. In 2010, she, along with a colleague from Radio Canada, was in charge of the rewriting and redevelopment of CBC's Journalistic Standards and Practices. 





 

Peter Fleischer
Peter Fleischer has worked as Google’s Global Privacy Counsel since 2006. Based in Europe, Peter is Google’s longest serving privacy leader. He counsels Google teams on how to design privacy-sensitive and legally-compliant products. Peter has designed many of Google’s privacy compliance programs. He has met with thousands of privacy officials and leaders worldwide. Peter has managed scores of regulatory actions around the world, and appeared before some of the world’s highest courts. Prior to joining Google, Peter worked for 10 years at Microsoft, as EMEA privacy leader and Director of Regulatory Compliance.





 



Christine Dobby
Christine Dobby is a business reporter for The Globe and Mail and has covered Canadian telecom for five years. She writes breaking news stories, analytical features and in-depth reports on industry trends and personalities. She received a SABEW Canada Best in Business award for her 2016 co-authored profile of then-CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais. Before joining The Globe in 2014, she reported for the Financial Post where she also covered media, technology and startups. Christine graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School, clerked at the Superior Court of Justice in Toronto and practised divorce law before switching careers and enrolling in the master of journalism program at Ryerson University.

 

 

Michael Geist
Dr. Michael Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law. He has been a visiting professor at universities around the world including the University of Haifa, Hong Kong University, and Tel Aviv University. He has obtained a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) degree from Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees from Cambridge University in the UK and Columbia Law School in New York, and a Doctorate in Law (J.S.D.) from Columbia Law School. Dr. Geist is the editor of many books including Law, Privacy and Surveillance in Canada in the Post-Snowden Era (2015, University of Ottawa Press). Dr. Geist serves on many boards, including CIRA, Internet Archive Canada, and the EFF Advisory Board. 



 

Susan Krashinsky Robertson
Susan Krashinsky Robertson covers marketing and media for Report on Business. Before joining The Globe and Mail in 2009, Susan worked as a freelance reporter contributing to the Ottawa Citizen, the Montreal Gazette and other publications, as well as CBC Radio's Dispatches and Search Engine. She has a Masters degree in journalism from Carleton University. In 2008 she worked at a radio station in Kigali, Rwanda as part of a media development project through Carleton. She has also lived in Osaka, Japan.

 

 

 

 

 

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Program subject to change